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taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
in this -- in this town when what he's doing is redefining terms. so, he's redefining tax reform not the traditional word of tax reform, meaning you lower rates and use that to close loopholes to lower rates. he wants to use it to say, well, we're going to close loopholes to pay for more spending. >> congressman tom price and why no budget. what was his explanation, why he has no budget. the senate has a budget and the house has a budget. >> again, he had a very difficult time answering that question. >> what did he say? >> i mean, it was like, look, you've listened to him. he's got no substantive answer when tom price-- >> what did he say, i'm too busy or they're working on it? >> look, it's going to come and avoiding eye contact, a couple of weeks. well, it's late already and he was challenged in the meeting, are you presenting this late on a rope-a-dope effort after we passed the budget that paul ryan is leading us on? it's all of those sorts of things and here this was a big attempt to try and bring people together. i thought, look, our members respect the presidency and we're respectful of him in th
because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
is not just a tax haven for russia, it is the tax haven for russian millionaires and billionaires. russia has invested $119 billion, that's with a "brks" in cyprus in 2011 alone. that's by far the largest recipient of russian investments in the world. equal amount of investment came back to russia from cyprus. funny how that works. russian investment is five times the total economic output for cyprus. russians account for $20 billion of total bank deposits or, tyler, as you mentioned, more than a third among the top russians in cyprus is the fert cider magnet now the biggest shareholder in the bank of cyprus. he has a lot of money in u.s. real estate as well. he brought donald trump's mansion and his daughter bout an apartment in sandy well. and alexander bought avraz steel. the mystery to me is why these wealthy russians kept so much money in cyprus when they knew the banks were in trouble. one reason is that there are fewer choices. if you look around the world, governments arie cracking down n tax evasion and money laundering. they're all complying with global capitalist. even with this 10
if republicans agreed to new tax increases. we have heard this before. however, the white house put a positive smpin on the meeting calling it a good substantive exchange and called it a good conversation. the president admitted more with abc news there is more to be done. >> ultimately it may be that the differences are just too wide. if their position is we can't do any revenue or we can only do revenue if we gut medicare or gut social security or medicaid. if that is the position we probably will not be able to get a deal. >> if your piece up on politico read conflicting reports, some say it was more of the same from the president and others say it was a step in the right direction for him to come up to the hill and visit bus. anything come out of this meeting yesterday and the ones that will follow today and the rest of the week? >> i would just replay that clip over and over and over again and that tells you everything you need to know about the next year. the president wants tax increases and he does not want to do a bill with big changes in entitlement reforms. republicans don't want ta
and medicaid, give the wealthy yet another tax break, put most of the burden on the poor and middle class and repeal obama care. this budget is going nowhere. it will be dead on arrival in the senate. it is pure fiscal mastur va tion. yet paul ryan gets credit for being a serious thinker. i will tell you this if paul ryan is a serious thinker i am an astronaut. take a look at the budget. doesn't add up. tomorrow, congressman keith ellison and peter welch, oh, boy. can't wait for that. come back and join us right here tomorrow. >> this is "the bill press show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: happy wednesday everybody. jacki schechner, you know i have so few things in my life. look how happy i am about my new coffee mug. >> what does it say? >> stephanie: it is green in time for st. patrick's day. >> ooh. does that mean there's no pinch ug? >> stephanie: here now is colin farrell. >> messing about with mrs. all the rumors are true. >> i got about a third of that. then again if he looks like colin farrell, it doesn't matter. >> stephanie: all right. now here we are. we'
are always trying to protect taxes or wealthy people? is that a problem out there with the rank-and-file voters? >> no, i mean -- i don't think so. i think that's obviously a misperception that's become a real perception by the public. but i think we have to talk about things in ways that people can relate to. i mean, if you're talking about taxes and taxing small businesses, you have to talk about the fact that if -- if -- if our small businessman has to pay more money to the government, then he's going to have less money to pay to his ememployers, and the ememployers will have less money to send kids to the school of their choice. i think it's a matter of talking about the debt differently. not just we are in imminent danger in a debt crisis in this country. but what does that mean to people? it means that our government is growing so fast and it's becoming so expensive that we're making payments to our credit cards that we can't afford, which means we have to keep -- we'll keep having this debate about needing more revenue to the government. well, that means less money in peo
meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignant they weren't brought into talks. let's hear what he had to say earlier on about the state of the current talks. >> first meeting very constructive. very honest discussion. we underscored how difficult the situation is and we'll now continue our discussions to find a solution by which we hope we will get some support from russia. >> in terms of that support, are we talking about a change of terms for the current existing 2.5 billion euro loan and an extension of 5 billion loan in addition to that? >
and the latest deposit tax scheme. happy anniversary, apple dividend and it was a year ago when the tech giant announced its dividend in 17 years. will apple succumb to the bigger payout as it faces stiffer competition from samsung. lululemon doing the downward facing dog with the transparency with the iconic black yoga pants prompting the retailer to cut sales guidance and boeing clinches an order from ryanair. of course, we begin with the markets. the dow and the s&p 500 hoping to avoid their first three-day losing streak of the year. wall street will be paying close attention in about three hours from now. that country's parliament scheduled to vote on a proposed tax on bank deposits and the controversial measure appears set to go down in defeat. here in the u.s., policymakers begin a two-day meeting in which they're expected to hold current policy. this is one of the meetings where we will get a press conference and people will be hanging on every word and every use of every adjective coming out of the fed chairman's mouth. are you expecting anything? >> i think that, frankly, we are looki
these days and so conditioned that the only thing that matters is tax policy even if taxes were so much higher in that roaring bull market that we're scared of their own shadows and they were hated or shunned by people who talk about it. case in point, retail sales. this morning it came out and they were terrific. you should not be shocked if you watch this show that we had the best retail numbers in five months, hardly a month goes by, and stores are telling me over and over again that the things are very strong and the thesis-mongering bears talk about gasoline is expensive and the expiration of the payroll tax holiday is devastating. the sequester is devastating, too. it is true that going over the fiscal cliff could have been horrendous and it destroyed confidence, but it certainly cured that. ever since then, the economy is better than anyone seems to want to talk about. we hear talk that it isn't. those bears endlessly drummed these negatives into our heads and they're thumb-sucking theorists. they're not schooled in the real world of companies as . they don't look bottoms up and
. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. michigan's governor is not waiting any longer for a plan from the city government in a very dramatic move today he named the washington attorney kevin orosz to take over the city as emergency manager. the republican governor rick schneider is joining us with kevyn orr. thanks very much for joining us. >> great to be with you. >> thanks for inviting us. >> mr. orr, let me start with you. what are you going to do? you have about 18 months to try to get detroit's finances in order. >> wolf, the first thing is make an assessment if i can of enhancing city services to the citizens of detroit. i'm going to sit down with consultants and restructuring team that the governor has in place to try to prioritize what we need to do next based upo
to affects our banking system. they had that choice. either that country defaults or they tax the banks and it is the russian money that is in there. >> let's say you have money in the caymen islands. >> oh, i do, greg. >> you probably do. and then all of a sudden the caymen islands decides they will take your money. isn't that an act of war? >> are you a dope for doing it. qaddafi did that. all of those people had the money. the libyan banks and qaddafi and your choice is to poke them in the chest and say give it back and he said no. that's the risk you take. you save on taxes and you put it in other countries, the risk is they will take your money. >> something out of this story that can anger people. given what happened in greece and cypress couldn't this happen to us in america? >> this could not happen to us in america. the idea it is russian money isn't true. it is a higher rate for those over100,000 euros. they are putting like 50,000 euros in cypress. the whole thing is enraging especially because the first story of i -- the first story i read,. >> i mean, my argument is it can
a one-time tax on bank accounts. why investors are around the world including the united states are growing more concerned about what is happening in cyprus. >> we're following a developing story in nevada where a military training exercise has ended in tragedy. the marine corps says seven marines were killed in an explosion. authorities investigating the exact cause which could include a related traffic accident. >> all this happening at hawthorne army depot in western nevada, 140 miles southeast of reno. helicopters brought in to take those patients to area hospitals. >>> at least 48 people today were killed in a wave of deadly attacks across iraq. >> in all, 17, yes, 17 car bombs, 7 roadside bombs and 2 shootings, this all coming of course on the tenth anniversary of the u.s.-led invasion of iraq. >> a live report from baghdad at the bottom of the hour. ♪ >> the trumpets sounding in the vatican, today marks the official start of pope francis' papacy. >> thousands of people, francis was inaugurated. the bishop of rome. >> francis cruise through st. peters square, in an open
indicating maybe the consumer is not feeling the pinch of higher taxes. meantime, coach popping pre-market on an upgrade from city. as a new report shows that it has been outspending apple in advertising to clench the market share gains it has seen. >> one step closer to getting the 787 back in the skies. the nefaa, a step to ending the two-month long grounding. >> we begin with the markets, by the skin of its teeth, the dow extending the winning streak and posting a record high close for the sixth consecutive day and the s&p closed higher despite hitting fresh five-year highs during yesterday's session. >> the bright spots here is what we saw managed to close higher yesterday were cyclical areas, semiconductors, energy and we had health care participating in that rally and bristol-myers. 11-year highs on that one. >> they screwed up badly and they bought a drug, not unlike glaxo they had, and it was red wine derivative drug and they fell. i will point out that the macarena is central to the thinking. >> really? >> because i went back and looked at this period november 1996 and was
, and lower taxes on the rich. >> give support to what is happening. >> reward those individuals creating jobs and that's what the republican budget does. >> i'm proud to support both the republican study committee budget and the house republican budget. >> it's amazing. these are the very same ideas that voters rejected in the election. tomorrow, republicans are expected to vote for the ryan budget overwhelmingly and that has some democrats licking their chops. "the hill" reports that the democrats are ready to slam gop on the ryan budget putting this out on tut this ad before the 2 election. so go ahead, republicans, vote for that ryan budget. the american people are going to have a very different vote for you very soon. joining me now is congressman -- democratic congressman grayson and cynthia tucker. >> good to be here, reverend. >> it might be the worst one yet. how do you explain these republicans in the house? >> it's bad for seniors, bad for children, and it's bad for everyone, even white guys. it raises the debt by $6 trillion. that's $20,000 for every man, women, and child in this c
that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> i must say ever since you started having regular intercourse your mind has lost it's a keen edge. you should reflect on that. [ laughter ] >> wait? >> stephanie: what? >> that's the same time you got a smort phone too. >> right? where is my smort phone at? >> what? >> it's not so smort if it can't tell me where it is. >> stephanie: did you want me to tell you the dumb thing i did with my smartphone yesterday? >> yeah. >> stephanie: you were trying to teach me to send text to my email, and you have to mark everything separately, and then someone called and i hit decline, and they all went away. >> you demanded answers right then and there, so there might be a way to check if they are still there -- >> s
the payroll tax hike, higher gas prices are a reason for concern. >> not only are we paying everything extra, we're paying the tolls, everything is going up but people's salaries. >> i spent a lot of money on gas because of the amount i commute. you just got the pay it. >> reporter: in fact, 72% of americans say the fluctuations in gas prices have impacted their spending, and roughly 23% said they delayed a mayor purchase because of higher gas prices. >> 70% of the economy is based on consumer spending. so you have a trifecta. consumers are concerned about the national economy. they just took a hit in their paychecks as a result of the yroll tax hike, and then on top of that the higheras prices are going to force them to make some decisions that they wouldn't otherwise have to make. so it's very concerning. >> reporter: pain at the pump is something that all americans can identify with. but many consumers say that they work their budgets around higher gas prices because commuting expenses are nonnegotiable. but how do the higher prices impact the rest of their spending remains to be seen. fo
black people were regularly kept from voting with roadblocks like literacy tests, poll taxes, and "you must be this white to vote" signs. [laughter] now that law is being challenged in the supreme court by shelby county, alabama. they argue that the law is unfair, because it applies only to states with histories of racial discrimination: alabama, arizona, georgia, louisiana, mississippi, south carolina, texas, parts of carolina, texas, virginia, and alaska, which has a sad history of discriminating against its african american population brian. [laughter] good guy. [ laughter ] he's a good guy. [laughter] but there's one key reason to strike this act down, as shelby -- there's one reason to get rid of this law as shelby county lawyer bert rein explained to the court. >> the problem to which the voting rights act was addressed is solved. >> stephen: you heard it, folks: racism is solved! jimmy, drop the fully integrated balloons! [cheers and applause] we overcame it! whoo! [cheers and applause] look at that! [cheers and applause] look at that! look at that! [cheers and applause] wow. [c
as bond market substitutes, and dividend paying stocks yield more than treasuries, and the tax treatment remains superior and far more bountiful than bond market, interest payments, cow upons taxed at a much higher income rate and created a very helpful investment climate. no matter what critics say, unless unemployment makes a quantum leap to 6.5%, yes, ben bernanke is the father of the bull market. that is for certain. and the fed has been incredibly important impetus behind the giant move. now, there are tons of pessimists out there who believe that because the fed created this environment, the fed is doomed to destroy it. the moment they take away the punch bowl and start tightening, they believe -- i think that's wrong. and more important, i think you are getting ahead of yourself if that's what are you worried about. and people have been worried for a year now. just because bernanke made the bull market, doesn't mean it's a pitiful helpful orphan, the bull can stand on its own four legs, and even if it wants on its own now, i expect bernanke won't tighten until we are at a place we
about cyprus and the atm bank lines and the tax scheme where they essentially bang the depositors for money. they violated the sacrosanct compact, i told him, that was meant to protect those deposits. stewart's all about common sense. he didn't think all of that much about the cyprus story. more importantly, he was hoping we wouldn't make too of it on this show because it would blow over since cyprus was a special case that couldn't easily be extrapolated and maybe even rally a little. then i went home after having some breakfast and i set out to study the charts and more on this later and settled in for serious ncaa bracketology while watching the canes play the tar heels. i tried to stay focused on march madness but i began to get bombarded by emails from bears worldwide -- [ shots fired ] brown bears, kodiaks, even koalas, telling me, this is it, jim, this is the big kahuna that i was being way too glib about the confiscation scheme that would rock my world. i knew not to dismiss the darn cyprus situation. i actually bothered to argue back, silly me. first i offered the standar
the house republican, paul ryan, budget plan. >> hand out more budget-busting tax breaks for the wealthy, and to pay for these wasteful tax breaks, ld -- it would end medicare guarantee, it would raise tax on middle class families. to appease the tea party, the ryan republican budget would risk recovery, and that's just a price too high. >> reporter: needless to say, republicans disagree. they believe that their budget which ultimately, they say, would balance, would provide more opportunity and more jobs for the american people, jon. jon: obviously, both sides trying to get their points out. what are the republicans saying about these budgetary matters? >> reporter: they're going after the budget that was proposed by senate budget chair patty murray. they say it increases spending, increases the debt, never balances and raises taxes. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell a few moments ago called it extreme. >> a party that once cared about hard working american families seems of to have gone off the leftmost edge of the reservation with this budget. d.c. democrats' priorities are jus
is it that allowed or condoned or suggested the idea that the lower threshold of 100,000 euros should be taxed? >> listen to the statement out of the european commission. one of the myriad of bureaucrats in brussels. the commission made it clear in the euro group meeting before and they capitalized before, the vote in the cypriot government that an alternative solution would be acceptable and preferably one without a levy on deposits below 100,000. the cypriots did not accept such an alternative scenario and they squarely placed the blame on the guys in the parliament building behind me. so we'll see what happens. the breaking point is at some point we're not going to keep stuffing the atms with money. and they'll have to figure it out and close down some banks, et cetera. >> i respect the detail that you've been through, but this market clearly believes that the deal will get done and the banks will get propped up with international aid. we're up 72 points on the dow. nobody in the market appears to be worried about it and we haven't seen a big move on bonds today. how do you reconcile that w
raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the marginal rate to the 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? they wanted to start trying to balance the budget because the treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? the fed tightened rates. doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily. if the fed stayed even by which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable and the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can
it by reducing and taking away child benefits, which was universal tax credit that was given to all mothers. they did that five months ago. now yesterday they announced that they were going to give credit to parents who were going out to work, but they weren't actually going to bring it into place until 2015 until the next government's in place. so we've got a long way to go until it actually happens. >> there was an interesting survey here in the united states salary.com, i'll give you the stats, they said that mothers spend about 94 hours a week working on their parental duties. this is no real surprise i suppose if you've got kids. things like child care, cooking and cleaning. if they were to get paid for those duties with today's sort of average salary rankings, it comes out to $112,000 a year you'd be paying them. so you generally think stay at home moms aren't respected in great britain or generally speaking within the community? >> no, they're not respected. women visible in country and there are only two countries in the whole world that don't recognize a family, that means a couple
? >> compound tax free offshore, then eventually return. >> you want to see how much they own in real estate, in goal, in forex? >> right. we're going to talk about -- exactly. bridge water -- oh, how is apple doing? >> the analyst out of btig is on the 11:00 hour this morning with us. to his credit he cut the stock when it was $634 last april. missed some of the up side but missed a lot of the downside. he does point out they're probably going to miss. guidance is probably going to miss. management doesn't know what to do with this money. there's products we don't know if they're in the pipeline or if management will even pursue them but he's giving them a huge benefit of the doubt. >> i thought this was one of the most brilliant upgrade i've ever seen. it starts off by basically saying this company is going to blow it. that's why i like it. the reason why i say it is important, this stock has become very psychological. he's basically saying -- he's been at the top before. we know in another bull market he was in there at the top. >> yes, he has the advantage of experience. >> he's saying i
were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and the federal reserve meeting next week, what could happen next and what should you do with your money? joining me right now to talk than, randy kroszner is the former federal reserve governor and current professor at the university of chicago booth school of business. and jim mcaughan is ceo of principle global investors with $280 billion in assets under gentlemen, it's good to have you on the program. thank you so much for joining us. >> sure. >> so many stories to talk about. jim, every time th
were worried about the impact of gasoline prices and increase in the payroll tax for us but consumers still spending money. important that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. if you're looking for something new to buy samsung will be happy to oblige vowing galaxy 4, 5 inch screen, larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch but hover your fingers over. it's the main competition. >>> with markets setting new records every day and federal reserve meeting next week, what could happen next and what should you do with your money. randy kroszner, the former federal reserve governor and former professor at the university of chicago school of business. jim mccaughan. gentlemen, good to have you on the program. thanks for joining us. so much to talk about. jim, every time the dow sets a new high it's a new record. we know corporate america is strong sitting on all this cash. is this telling us the economy is stronger than we think or is this just because the federal reserve has created an environment where there just are very if you alternatives to owning u.s. stocks. >> i
thought this was going to be a big heavy tax on consumers this year. >> the pump price was getting up there because the gasoline wasn't being made. we still haven't seen what might happen this summer. gasoline produces have never been as high in february as they were last year. so that's something to march. but the crude market had a lot of inches, the chinese economy looked like it was rip roaring in gdp dpoeth. and both of those were kind of head fakes at the beginning of the year. the chinese had new refining capacity, they're using it and pushing product out into the world market. >> we have been watching a lot of new production that's coming online in the united states. and people think that that could be the thing that really pulls us out, a new job creation, a new economic stimulus coming from energy. are you in that camp? >> actually i was among those who started that camp. i got on to that bandwagon pretty early. we think gdp could be by 2020 three full percentage points higher than it would be without the oil, the jobs created will be somewhere between 3 million and 4 millio
company with a big 3.9% yield? a heck of a lot better than treasuries after the tax benefits. it's been left behind by the rest of its cohort. i can't believe i'm talking about this one because it's so far behind. i'm talking about one of the great american companies, merck, mrk, the pharmaceuticals giant that's stumbled more times in the last few months than a college kid on st. paddy's day. since early december, the early pharma names have roared. pfizer up 12%, bristol miers up. i'm typical of my eighth anniversary, i somehow got blue ink on my hand. and cell gene jumped 43%. meanwhile, merck has done nothing. it's actually down about 1% over the same period. right now there are reasons merck has underperformed the rest of the ones. in december, the good -- in december, the company got bad clinical trials from a new cholesterol drug that they were working on. and i thought it was going to be a big one, i have to tell you. so merck decided to stop development here in the u.s. and pull the drug overseas where it was already approved. this was one that i thought was just going to be the
in to stem the decline with the absolute dumbest plan i had seen, to tax the depositors, the small-time depositors of a country with hot money, perhaps hot laundered money from russia. that's right. the europeans with the help of the imf reminding you just how stupid of the concept of the euro is, how intendable it is to keep your money in a european bank. the moronic plan gave a super reason to go right back into gold. now before i tell you how i think you're going to get still more fantastic chance to buy the precious metal, let me say i don't want to fall prey to the notion what should happen will happen. i think if i had money in the european bank, i would say to heck with it, i'm going put it in an american bank. who needs this worry. i would typically feel that way if i were wealthy and had the ability to wire the money with a key stroke to let's say jpmorgan where i got my money now. even with the revelations, revelations i should add, brought to light by jpmorgan itself. it's so easy to move your money, i can't believe any wealthy person stays in the european banks. you can
will cost more chases will be taken away from us and that taxes will go higher, and even beyond that, that these too regulations will cost jobs. it's all par of a very orchestrated well-funded scare campaign. hal: when you look up, when you google repeal obamacare, for example, the paid sponsors that come up at the top the first one is the heritage foundation. the petition to repeal obamacare by the heritage foundation. the washington post, the most recent one, lots of americans still want to repeal obamacare. that's the title of the story. lots of americans still want to repeal obamacare. ok. it's hilarious. the chart they have, and it's 35%, this is the lots. how many self-identified republicans do you think there are in this country? somewhere between 32% and 35% of the electorate. that has not changed for all practical purposes. people now identify themselves as independents because of the iraq war even though they vote for republicans every time, for bush twice voted against obama because of things like this, they still identify them. you're going to find go across the board wom
't need any taxes. >> there you go. yeah. >> talk ourselves into a circle. >> from the basketball court to the courtroom. the athletic star relieved after a big legal decision. >> later, wild animals, tamed, as pets. foxes, maybe? what do you think? are they worthwhile companions? how much would you pay for one? you are watching "world news now". ♪ "world news now" weather brought to you by lyme away turbo power. using that cleaner.od luck excuse me, miss ? he's right. those are tough hard water stains, and that cleaner's not gonna cut it. truth is, 85% of us have hard water and many don't even know it. you need lime-a-way. lime-a-way is specially formulated to conquer hard water stains. it's 4 times more effective at removing lime scale than the leading bathroom cleaner. see the lime-a-way difference or your money back. [ female announcer ] stress sweat is different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. given way to sleeping. tossing
? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> i'm christine romans. wall street optimistic about today's federal reserve decision. that's pushing up stock futures. investors hoping to hear the fed reiterate that it will stay the course, staying the course, of course, means pumping money into the american economy especially concerns about a possible bailout in cyprus flare up. summer won't come soon enough for twinkie lovers. you know who you are. a bankruptcy judge approving hostess' sale to two investment firms and bringing twinkies, ho-hoes and ding dongs back from the dead. the deal said to be worth $410 million. the new owners hope to have twinkies and its snack cake brethren back on your store shelves by summer so you can stop with the locked door in your office and your stash. you'll
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